Richard Sherman was the center of attention during the Seattle Seahawks’ win over the Buffalo Bills on Monday night. It wasn’t all positive, though.

In the final seconds of the first half, Sherman hit Bills kicker Dan Carpenter low, but it wasn’t flagged because he was ruled offsides. The Bills were forced to re-kick it twice more, resulting in a missed field goal after a delay of game penalty. The three consecutive plays were certainly controversial, which understandably had everyone on Buffalo’s sideline fuming.

“It’s not like it just jumps off the Tani Tupou Authentic Jersey page to me when I watch him. Because he can go through phases of time when he blends in. But then you look at it and say, wait, he just blocked three shots, he just got two offensive rebounds, he just led the break, got us a layup — he can do a lot, this guy. He can do a little bit of everything.”

Save for a minor hitch in his shooting mechanic, per Self, Jackson’s game has no glaring holes. He can do all the mixtape things: He is 6-foot-7 and superathletic, he has a ball handler’s touch, he is an excellent passer, and he has an innate ability to create angles and make tough shots in traffic. But he might be even better at cutting off the ball and better still as a defender, particularly on the perimeter. Jackson could end up being KU’s best perimeter defender, which is no small feat for a guy playing next to Mason and Graham, two of the nation’s best.

That is why Self, whose teams have typically featured two traditionally big forwards, is figuring out how to play four guards at any given time. It’s a stylistically on-trend move, as the game gets smaller and smaller from the NBA on down, and it’s one Jackson — the “tallest guard” in that four-guard lineup — seems entirely capable of taking on. If he scores 30, great. But he might score 12 and be every bit as crucial.

“You can’t label him as any one thing,” Self said. “He’s just a basketball player.”

Jackson can play the saxophone — well enough that if he had practiced and hadn’t been so nervous, he could have gotten through the solo performance his teammates wanted him to put on at Kansas’ “Late Night in the Phog” event in October. (“I was not comfortable Thomas Rawls Authentic Jersey playing in front of 16,000 people,” he said.) He’s into chess, and he started a chess club at Prolific Prep in Napa, California, where he spent his senior year of high school and was a member of the National Honor Society. Ask him to describe himself, and the first thing he will say is that he’s “kind of an introvert.”

He is also, it turns out, a next-level competitive freak.